Mixes In Jars #11 – Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chocolate chip cookies are the go to cookie in our house whenever someone craves something sweet and wants cookies. Having this mix on the shelf in the pantry is a great time saver and makes just the right amount so we aren’t stuck with dozens of cookies to eat before they get stale. Although it’s unlikely they’d go to waste, moderation allows me to make a new treat sooner and far more often.

Chocolate Chip Cookies

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3/4 Cup Granulated Sugar

1/2 Cup Packed Brown Sugar

1 3/4 Cups Flour

1 tsp. Baking Powder

1/2 tsp. Baking Soda

1/2 – 3/4 Cup Chocolate Chips

1/2 Cup Softened Butter

1 Egg

1 tsp. Vanilla

Combine dry ingredients and chips.  Mix thoroughly.  Add softened butter, egg, and vanilla.  Mix until completely blended, I did this with my hands. Shape into walnut size balls and place on parchment lined cookie sheet.

Bake at 375 for 10 – 12 minutes until lightly browned.  Cool on sheet 1 minute.

To assemble mix in jar, layer dry ingredients in a 1.5 pint jar in above order and attach tag:

Empty mix into large bowl.  Mix to combine.  Add 1/2 cup softened butter, 1 egg, and 1 tsp. vanilla.  Mix until completely blended. Shape into walnut size balls and place on parchment lined cookie sheet. Bake at 375 for 10 – 12 minutes until lightly browned.  Cool on sheet 1 minute. Yields 2 1/2 dozen cookies.

When I made these tonight I made three jars of the mix for the pantry. I started filling quart jars with the ingredients, but these turned out to be too big. Switching to 1.5 pint jars was perfect. When I transferred the sugars to the smaller jars, the sides got a bit messy, but I doubt the jars will be in the pantry for long.

Cookies in the cookie jar and another mix-in-a-jar in the pantry, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

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Is A Muffin Still A Muffin If You Frost It? – Mandarin Orange Muffins

I can’t think of too many things that aren’t made better with frosting, but the question remains:  If you put frosting on a muffin, is it a muffin or a cupcake?  Either way, these muffins are excellent.

Mandarin Orange Muffins

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2 3/4 Cup Muffin Mix

2 Eggs

1 1/2 tsp. Vanilla

1/2 Cup Melted Butter

1/2 Cup Milk

1 6 oz. Can Mandarin Oranges chopped and undrained

3/4 Cup Shredded Carrot

  1. Combine eggs, vanilla, milk, and butter in large bowl.  Mix well.
  2. Add muffin mix and stir with wooden spoon just until blended.  Do not over mix – batter should be lumpy.
  3. Fold in mandarin oranges and carrot.
  4. Fill greased muffin tins 3/4 full and bake at 450 for 5 minutes.  Reduce heat to 325 and continue baking for 9 – 12 minutes until center is firm.

Pineapple Orange Frosting

1 Tub Cool Whip

1 Small Package Vanilla Pudding

6 oz. Mandarin Oranges with juice

1 Pint Crushed Pineapple with juice

  1. Combine ingredients in bowl and stir until combined.
  2. Let sit 5 minutes until pudding begins to set.
  3. Frost cooled muffins.

These muffins have an almost ‘cornbread’ consistency and would definitely not be considered sweet. The frosting makes these muffins more of a dessert than a breakfast food, but who doesn’t like having dessert for breakfast?

Hubby preferred these muffins without the frosting, while the kids gobbled them up with the frosting.  Either way, these are definitely a great breakfast option, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

The Sugar Cookie Quest – Variation #1: Soft Drop Cookies

Sugar Cookies are one of those cookies that pretty much every loves.  What’s not to love?  They are tasty, full of sugar, and typically have icing, decorations, or sprinkles on them.  Does it get any better than that?

The only thing that would make them even better would be to have a recipe that comes together quickly, as many recipes for sugar cookies are quite labor intensive. Although there is a time and place for rolling out cookie dough, cutting it into wonderful shapes, and hand frosting each one intricately — that time and place has yet to reveal itself in my home.  Typically when it comes to baking I want to get in and get out so I can begin my next project.  Not that I don’t enjoy baking — don’t get me wrong I love it.  It’s just that there aren’t enough hours in the day to stop and indulge in long-winded baking projects as often as I want to, so an alternative is required.

Of all the cookies I bake, sugar cookies are the ones that have caused me the most distress. Growing up my father always made the sugar cookie dough used in a cookie press.  I love these cookies and to this day they are my favorite, trouble is I have no luck when it comes to using a cookie press.  I have had no less than six of these gadgets, all different models, types, and makers, and each one I have either broken or not been able to get it to work.  Incompetent?  I suppose so, but there are just some things, such as mechanical inclination, that evade me most of the time.

In order to enjoy the sugar cookies I grew up with, I have been reduced to making the dough, flattening it on the counter, and cutting out shapes.  Sure this is a viable option, but it just isn’t the same, and is certainly not a quick project.

Being that sugar cookie dough is so versatile and able to be used in so many recipes other than just cookies (there really is not such thing as “just cookies” but you get what I mean), I decided it was time to start a quest for sugar cookie recipes that were quick, easy, convenient, and heck, why not even see if I could come up with one I could pop most of the ingredients in a jar.

The first recipe I tried turned out excellent.  It was a soft sugar cookie that took very little time to make, as it is a drop cookie, and even less time for the family to devour. There is still some tweaking to be done, but for now, this one remains in the running for a potential place in my permanent cookie recipe binder.

Soft Drop Sugar Cookies

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Yes, those are Christmas sprinkles! I had some leftover and rather than open a new container…

1/2 Cup Butter, softened

1/2 Cup Vegetable or Peanut Oil

1/2 Cup Granulated Sugar

1/2 Cup Powdered Sugar

1 Egg

1 tsp. Vanilla

1/2 tsp. Baking Soda

1/2 tsp. Cream of Tartar

1/4 tsp. Salt

2 1/4 Cups Flour

  • Cream butter, oil, and sugars in large mixing bowl until smooth.  Beat in eggs and vanilla.
  • Add baking soda, cream of tartar, and salt.
  • Add flour slowly with mixer on low.
  • Place heaping teaspoons of dough on parchment lined cookie sheet and top with sprinkles. Bake at 350 for 8 minutes, just until edges start to brown.
  • Remove from oven and let cookies cool on sheet for 3 minutes before removing to cooling rack.

I prepared this recipe using a mixer, as originally instructed, but would prefer not to have to drag out the mixer if I don’t have to.  Next time I make this dough I will not only experiment with combining all the dry ingredients as would be in a jar, but also I will try hand mixing the cookies to see how they turn out.  If this works, I will definitely be putting jars of this cookie mix on the pantry shelf.

For now, I am glad these wonderfully soft and flavorful sugar cookies turned out and I am on my way to finding the perfect sugar cookie recipe, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

Muffin Mix-In-A-Jar

While on my quest to find quick and easy mixes-in-jars recipes, I found quite a few recipes for muffins that sounded really great.  Trouble was that many of them called for either dry milk or a dry buttermilk blend that I don’t use.  It is expensive and what I consider “processed,” which is something we are trying to avoid.

Researching these ingredients on the internet, I learned that they can easily be omitted from a recipe if you use milk or buttermilk in place of the water when preparing the mix to bake.  Granted it is one more ingredient you need to be sure to have on hand when preparing, but it is rare when I don’t have milk in the house and buttermilk can easily be fudged by combining milk with a little lemon juice or vinegar. Seeing as I prefer to use fresh ingredients over processed ones when possible, it is a substitute that will work for us.

I have used the following muffin base mix twice so far and everyone really likes it.  It isn’t too sweet which would take away from the fruit in these muffins and the result is moist and dense, the perfect combination for a muffin. The recipe is fairly large, but can be prepared and then stored in pint and a half jars for individual servings or a 1/2 gallon jar and then just use 2 3/4 cups of the mixture when preparing the muffins.

Muffin Base Mix

9 Cups Flour

2 1/2 Cups Granulated Sugar

3 Tbsp. Baking Powder

1 Tbsp. Baking Soda

1 Tbsp. Salt

Combine these ingredients in a large bowl and blend well.  Transfer mix to sealable containers.

The first muffin I made with this mix with a Strawberry Muffin.  I wasn’t sure I wanted to try this one, but Grace told me that she thought it would taste like Strawberry Shortcake when done.  She was right!

Strawberry Shortcake Muffins

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2 3/4 Cups Muffin Mix

2 Eggs

1 1/2 tsp. Vanilla

1 Cup Milk

1/2 Cup Melted Butter

1 – 1 1/2 Cups Fresh or Frozen Strawberries

  1. Combine eggs, vanilla, milk, and butter in large bowl.  Mix well.
  2. Add muffin mix and stir with wooden spoon just until blended.  Do not over mix – batter should be lumpy.
  3. Fold in strawberries.
  4. Fill greased muffin tins 3/4 full and bake at 450 for 5 minutes.  Reduce heat to 325 and continue baking for 9 – 12 minutes until center is firm.

Having a ready-made homemade muffin mix in the pantry to use for a quick breakfast or late-night snack is awesome. Being able to change the fruit ingredient to practically anything I might have on hand at the moment and have muffins in less than 30 minutes is yet one more way to spend less time preparing homemade goodies and more time enjoying time with the family, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

Tricks Of The Trade – Mixes In Jars #10 Beer Batter

The more years I spend in the kitchen, the more I learn.  Cooking is one of those things that has a never-ending learning curve which is a good thing.

Today I decided to try out another mixes-in-jars recipe I found on the internet.  After trying so many of these recipes, I have come to expect that some recipes are not going to work.  So often I have prepared a recipe as written only to find out that it is not as promised.  One aspect especially that is often lacking is the ability for the mix to fit in a jar.

Several of the recipes I’ve worked on haven’t even come close to fitting in a quart jar.  One actually had more than 6 cups of dry ingredients — what canning jar holds 6 cups?  Okay, so a 1/2 gallon jar would hold it, but talk about wasted space.  The ones that didn’t work I played with until I came up with a recipe that would fit in a canning jar or scrapped the recipe altogether.  Why someone would put a recipe on the internet that hasn’t been tested or isn’t correct, I just don’t get.

Anyway, today I decided test a recipe for a beer batter mix.  Although this recipes ingredients do not fill a pint jar, they come close enough for it to still seal nicely.  The batter itself is very good and one that I will gladly put on the shelf.  What I learned from trying this recipe however is a trick that for some reason I never thought to use when making onion rings.

After preparing the batter and dipping one onion ring in it to test, I dropped it in the boiling oil only to watch as bead after bead of the batter pulled away from the onion and floated to the top of the oil.  This used to happen when I deep-fried chicken or fish, but what I discovered years ago was that dipping the meat in flour prior to the batter cut down on the batter falling off.  So…why couldn’t this work with onion rings.

I dipped the onion rings in milk,

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the flour,

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then the batter,

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and finally the boiling oil.

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One or two drops of batter floated to the top, but the remaining batter formed an encasement around the onion that made for the most delicious onion rings I’ve ever had. The batter, although quite thick around the onion, was still light and flaky.

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Onion dipped in flour on left; no flour on right.

 

I’ve made beer batter onion rings in the past, and they turned out good, but this recipe and the way it held to the onions made these “company worthy.”  Even Hubby told me that although he liked my old onion rings, these new ones were so much better.

Beer Batter Mix

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1 1/4 Cups Flour

2 tsp. Salt

1 tsp. Paprika

1/2 tsp. Baking Powder

1 12 oz. Can of Beer

Combine mix and beer in bowl and whisk until smooth.  Dip onions, fruit, or meat in milk or water, dredge through flour, and then dip in batter.  Deep fry until golden brown, about 3-5 minutes for onions, turning once.

This recipe was so good I can’t wait to use it again.  The way the family went for these onion rings, I know I’ll be making them again real soon.

Using the experience I have gained by spending years in the kitchen to improve upon an old favorite is one of the most fulfilling aspects of being a housewife, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

The Perfect Brownie Quest – Mixes In Jars #9

For the past month I have been on a quest to develop a recipe for the perfect brownie.  Trouble is, there already is a perfect brownie — it’s out of a box.  Yep, confession time.  I love boxed brownies.  My grandmother made them; my mother made them; and I have been making them since I was 11 years old.  Up until this year, this month in fact, I had never tried making brownies from scratch.  I’d had homemade brownies at picnics, parties, and a few friends houses, and although very good, they weren’t what I was used to.  They were not boxed brownies.

I guess I was somewhat of a brownie snob in expecting a homemade version to be as moist, chewy, chocolatey and irresistible as what I’d been brought up on and come to love.  And being the closed-minded person I am when it comes to trying new foods, it was only natural in my quest for the perfect brownie mix that I would do my best to imitate what I was used to.

There are so many different recipes for brownies on the internet and deciding where to begin was a challenge in itself.  After hours upon hours of reading recipes, deciphering the differences between cake-like, fudgey, and chewy brownies, and comparing everything I’d learned to recipes I’d printed off through the years or collected from friends and neighbors, I began testing recipes.

Every week for the past month I have tried a different recipe.  Actually what I’ve been doing is closing in on the perfect brownie.  With each test, I tweaked the basic recipe I started with, adjusting proportions, changing ingredients, and inching bit by bit closer to my goal.

Tonight I made my fourth batch of brownies and think it’s almost there.  It is moist, chewy, chocolatey, homemade (not boxed), and the dry ingredients will fit in a quart mason jar for easy storage in the pantry.  One goal of this endeavor has been that the final product had to be as easy and convenient as pulling out a box of brownies, adding eggs, oil, and water, and baking.  I didn’t want making homemade brownies to be something I had to schedule into my day.  Being able to whip up a batch of brownies in a matter of minutes, during a commercial break or five minutes before my guests arrived, was essential.  Otherwise making brownies would become something I did only when I had time (which let’s be honest is hard to come by) or on special occasions.

Here are a few facts I picked up about making brownies/baking along the way:

  1. Substituting some brown sugar for a portion of the granulated sugar in a recipe will provide more moisture to the final product because of the molasses content.
  2. Molasses is acidic and as such will cause baking soda to react in a recipe.  Therefore switching out the baking powder for baking soda in brownie recipes is okay as long as you use some brown sugar.
  3. Adding a little extra flour makes for chewier brownies.
  4. The addition of more oil to brownie batter will make them heavier, thus chewier and more fudge-like.
  5. It is better to under-bake your brownies slightly if you want a chewy version.

So here’s the recipe I ended up with tonight:

Chewy Fudge Brownies

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  • 1 1/4 Cups Granulated Sugar
  • 3/4 Cup Brown Sugar
  • 1 1/3 Cups Flour
  • 2/3 Cup Cocoa
  • 1 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla Powder (if you do not have vanilla powder, add 2 tsp. vanilla extract with other liquid ingredients when preparing brownies)

Layer these in a quart mason jar and seal until ready to use.

To prepare brownies:

Dump brownie mix into a large bowl.  Stir to combine.  Make a well in center of mix and add:

  • 4 eggs
  • 3/4 Cup Melted Butter
  • 1/4 Cup Peanut or Vegetable Oil
  • 1/4 Cup Water

Stir until combined.  Pour prepared brownie mix into a greased 13 x 9 pan.  Bake in 350 oven for 25-30 minutes.

These brownies are nearly perfect — at least in my attempt to make a brownie that is quick, easy, convenient, chewy, and reminiscent of boxed brownies.  In the end, when I compare my final recipe to the tons of recipes out there for homemade brownies, it is very similar.  Many of the differences are based in the type of brownies I’m comparing my recipe to.  Cake-like and  fudgey brownies seem to be more popular on the recipe sites.  Chewy versions were not as abundant.

I can’t say that I won’t continue to tweak my brownie recipe, because making brownies every week for the past month on the premise that I was in search of the perfect brownie was a great excuse to have brownies on the counter continually.  I’m not sick of them yet, and neither is the family, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

Mixes In Jars #8 – Cobbler Mix

What is the difference between crumble, crisp, cobbler, buckle, grunt/slump, and a Brown Betty?  I had no idea until I did a little research and found out the following:

Crumble: A baked dish of fresh fruit that is topped with an oat-based streusel.  I made a mixes-in-jars version of this a few weeks ago: Fruit Crumble Mix

Crisp:  Exactly the same as a crumble without the oats.

Cobbler:  A baked dish of fruit topped with individually dropped biscuits.

Buckle:  A baked dish with a cakey batter on the bottom, topped with fruit.  When it is baked the cake rises around the fruit and the whole thing buckles inwards.

Grunt/Slump:  A cobbler that is cooked entirely on the stove-top.  The biscuits are steamed on top of the fruit.

Brown Betty:  This is the same as a crisp, but there is layer of streusel under the fruit as well as on top.

Knowing this, I was able to decide which mix-in-jars I wanted to try next, my favorite of the group — Cobbler.

Peach Cobbler

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  • 1 Cup Flour
  • 1 tsp. Baking Powder
  • 1 Cup Sugar
  • 1 tsp. Powdered Vanilla
  • 1 Quart and 1 Pint Pie Filling
  • 1/2 Cup Melted Butter
  • 1 Egg

Combine dry ingredients in bowl.  Add melted butter and egg, mix until well combined.

Grease 13 x 9 pan.  Pour pie filling into greased pan.  Top with tablespoonfuls of the cobbler mix.

Bake at 375 for 30 minutes.

To assemble mix in jar, combine dry ingredients and seal in canning jar.  Attach tag:

Pour mix in mixing bowl.  Add 1/2 cup melted butter and 1 egg, mix until well combined. Empty 1 quart and 1 pint pie filling into 13 x 9 greased pan.  Top with tablespoonfuls of the cobbler mix. Bake at 375 for 30 minutes.

I love this recipe because by using my own canned pie filling this dessert comes together in less than 5 minutes rather than 30 or more.  Definitely a great time saver when getting home close to the dinner hour.  Time saving and exceptionally tasty, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

Mixes-In-Jars #7 – English Muffin Bread

I love English muffins, especially with kiwi-lime jam and butter.  When a neighbor of mine gifted me a loaf of English muffin bread last fall however, I found a new favorite.  Grace too enjoyed the bread, but the only trouble with the bread was it had buttermilk in it, and Grace can’t eat anything with homogenized dairy products without suffering stomach problems.  The same reason why she has never been able to stomach store-bought English muffins.

Researching other recipes on the internet revealed that raw milk could be substituted for the buttermilk and water in the original recipe.  This is the recipe I ended up with:

English Muffin Bread

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  • 2 1/2 – 3 Cups Bread Flour
  • 2 1/4 tsp. Instant or Rapid-Rise Yeast
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Sugar
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 1 1/2 Cups Milk, heated to 120 degrees
  • Cornmeal for dusting

Grease loaf pan and dust with cornmeal.  Combine flour, yeast, sugar, salt and baking soda in large bowl. Stir in hot milk until thoroughly combined.  Cover dough with greased plastic wrap and let rise in warm place for 30 minutes or until dough is bubbly and doubled in size.

Stir dough to deflate and pour in prepared pan.  Cover pan with greased plastic and let dough rise another 30 minutes.

Remove plastic wrap and bake in oven pre-heated to 375 for 25 to 30 minutes.  Cool completely on wire rack.

Slice, toast, and serve.

To make mix-in-jar combine dry ingredients, less the yeast, and put in 1 1/2 pint jar.  Place a separate bag with yeast on top.  Seal.  Attach tag:

Grease loaf pan and dust with cornmeal.  Empty mix and yeast in large bowl. Stir in 1 1/2 cups 120 degree milk until thoroughly combined.  Cover dough with greased plastic wrap and let rise in warm place for 30 minutes or until dough is bubbly and doubled in size. Stir dough to deflate and pour in prepared pan.  Cover pan with greased plastic and let dough rise another 30 minutes. Remove plastic wrap and bake in oven pre-heated to 375 for 25 to 30 minutes.  Cool completely on wire rack. Slice, toast, and serve.

All the recipes I found recommend toasting this bread before eating.  In fact, several of them indicate it is essential. I followed the instructions and found the bread excellent.  Hubby, however, being the rebel he is, had to be original and ate the bread without toasting it.  He said it was excellent and ate several slices plain and then made himself a headcheese sandwich with a few more.  So I guess toasting is optional.

Grace has never been able to stomach English muffins bought from the store, so finding a recipe that she can eat because I use raw milk rather than homogenized dairy products is great, and for this we are — Simply Grateful.

Mixes In Jars #6 – Lemon Poppy Seed Muffins

Now that Grace can drive, when she comes to me at 7:00 at night and says, “I want something sweet — I want muffins!” I can go to my list of recipes I want to try, bounce them off her until one clicks, and then send her up to the store to pickup anything we might not have on hand.  This is exactly what happened last night when she proclaimed she wanted muffins, except she already knew that she wanted lemon poppy seed muffins.

Thankfully I had a recipe already picked out and waiting for a trial, but there were a few things I didn’t have, so off to the store she went.  While she was gone, I whipped up what I could, then filled in the blanks when she returned.

Lemon Poppy Seed Muffins

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  • 2/3 Cup Sugar
  • Grated Zest and Juice of 1 Lemon
  • 2 Cups Flour
  • 2 tsp. Baking Powder
  • 1/4 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 1/4 tsp. Salt
  • 3/4 Cup Sour Cream or Yogurt
  • 2 Large Eggs
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla
  • 1/2 Cup Unsalted Melted Butter
  • 2 Tbsp. Poppy Seeds
  • Icing:  1 Cup Powdered Sugar mixed with 3 Tbsp Lemon Juice

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Grease or butter muffin pan

In large bowl combine sugar, lemon zest, flour, soda, salt and poppy seeds.

In small bowl, whisk sour cream or yogurt, eggs, vanilla, lemon juice, and melted butter.

Pour liquid ingredients over dry ingredients and stir to combine.  Don’t over mix.

Divide dough among the muffin cups.  Bake 4 minutes at 450 then reduce oven to 350 and continue cooking for another 12 – 17 minutes.

Let cool before icing.

To make a muffin mix in a jar, there are two options.

The first is to combine the dry ingredients in a 1 1/2 pint jar and attach a tag with the remaining instructions.  The second would be to use a quart jar and also include the 1 cup of powdered sugar in a separate plastic bag for the icing.  Either way, the tag would read as follows:

Empty mix into large bowl (removing powdered sugar pack and setting aside). In separate bowl, whisk 3/4 cup sour cream or yogurt, 2 large eggs, 1 tsp. vanilla, 3 Tbsp. lemon juice, and 1/2 cup melted butter. Pour liquid ingredients over dry ingredients and stir to combine.  Don’t over mix. Divide dough among muffin cups.  Bake 4 minutes at 450 then reduce oven to 350 and continue baking for 12 – 17 minutes more. To make icing, combine 1 cup powdered sugar with 3 Tbsp. lemon juice.

The family loved these and ate six of them before the night was over.  I however thought they needed a little something.  I found the texture a bit dry and not as lemony as I would have liked.  To improve on this next time I plan to make the following changes:

  1. Instead of 2/3 Cup Granulated Sugar, I am going to use 1/3 Cup Granulated Sugar and 1/3 Cup Brown Sugar.
  2. I will add 2 Tbsp. additional melted butter.
  3. I am going to decrease the flour by 2 Tbsp.
  4. Instead of the lemon zest, I will use 1 tsp. Pure Lemon Extract.
  5. Also, the original recipe called for large eggs.  My eggs were medium-sized.  I will increase the eggs by 1 if I don’t have large eggs available.
  6. Lastly, I used sour cream when I made these.  Next time I am going to try homemade yogurt.

Even though these muffins were a hit with the family, I know I can make them better.  The more I bake, the more I learn how to make adjustments so recipes can become exactly the way I want them to be, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

Mixes In Jars #5 – Dried Cranberry Vanilla Chip Cookie

Who doesn’t love cookies?  Here at our house cookies are probably the most requested treat.  It surpasses ice cream, cake, candy, even brownies.  So when it comes to finding new recipes to keep the troops from getting bored, I am always on the lookout.

A few nights ago the kids wanted something sweet to eat.  I took advantage of the opportunity to try a new mix in jars recipe.  These recipes allow me to whip up a batch of cookies quickly and doesn’t leave us with six dozen cookies.  We had 2 1/2 dozen cookies to enjoy, which means in a day or two I can try another kind.

Dried Cranberry Vanilla Chip Cookies

  • 3/4 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 1/2 Cup Packed Brown Sugar
  • 1 1/4 Cup Craisins/Dried Cranberries
  • 1/2 Cup Vanilla Chips
  • 1 3/4 Cups Flour
  • 1 tsp. Baking Powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 1/2 Cup Softened Butter
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla

Combine dry ingredients, chips, and cranberries.  Mix thoroughly.  Add softened butter, egg, and vanilla.  Mix until completely blended, I did this with my hands. Shape into walnut size balls and place on parchment lined cookie sheet.

Bake at 375 for 10 – 12 minutes until lightly browned.  Cool on sheet 1 minute.

To assemble mix in jar, layer dry ingredients in above order and attach tag:

Empty mix into large bowl.  Mix to combine.  Add 1/2 cup softened butter, 1 egg, and 1 tsp. vanilla.  Mix until completely blended. Shape into walnut size balls and place on parchment lined cookie sheet. Bake at 375 for 10 – 12 minutes until lightly browned.  Cool on sheet 1 minute.

These are a new family favorite.  The bulk of the cookies were gone the night I made them and the remainder the next day.  Definitely a keeper.  Now I can experiment with another cookie in a day or two, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.