The Grill Master – It’s All In The Sauce

Barbecue Blog-1

Growing up I was lived in a home where my father was the only person who barbecued. Mom was in charge of cooking in the kitchen, but whenever it came to grilling anything from hot dogs to prime rib roast, Dad was in charge.

The line of “men” being in charge at the grill wasn’t something that started with my father. His father and my mother’s father were also the Grill Masters at their homes and whenever we went to any family reunions on either side of the family, men were always the ones who hung around the barbecue pit, drinking beer, sneaking tastes, and chasing away any woman who came within ten feet of the hot coals.

For 20+ years I was comfortable with this barbecue hierarchy and never questioned it.

Then I moved out on my own and started dating my now husband, Hubby. While living on my own I never invested in a grill, but Hubby bought me a little hibachi for my balcony so we could grill steaks, burgers, or just about anything we wanted. While we dated, Hubby took care of the grilling. I don’t think it was because he wanted to do the grilling, but more because of my ignorance when it came to cooking anything anywhere other than the stove.

After we got married and I began accompanying Hubby to barbecues at his parent’s house however, it became immediately clear that things were very different in his family when it came to the “Rules of the Grill.” There were no men gathered around the grill, no beer drinking and comradery going on by the coals, and no taste testing hot off the grate. Nope, just my mother-in-law standing over the grill, sweating, cussing, and completely alienated from everyone else. Until the food was put on the table for everyone to enjoy, it was as if the grill and my mother-in-law didn’t exist.

Owning a barbecue for Hubby and I didn’t come until a few years after we got married, but when we did get one, I held my ground when it came to grilling.  I took care of the food preparation inside the house, and Hubby was to be in charge of the grilling. I never gave it much thought because he’d done it while we dated on our little hibachi at my apartment, but after we were married, his attitude changed. At one point he even pointed out to me that “His Father” didn’t have to grill — that “His Mother” did all the food prep including the grilling.

Being the so understanding and ever patient wife that I was back then (NOT), I quickly pointed out that he didn’t live in Oz anymore and here in the real world if he wanted to have a barbecue, he was going to have to do the grilling. At first he protested by burning practically everything he put on the grill, but I held my ground. A battle of wills that I knew was not going to end well…or at least with me being the victor.

Finally after many arguments and too many ruined meals, grilling became a thing of the past. Dinners were planned rather than barbecues and Hubby won. Or so he thought.

Summer is the time for grilling, but even in the dead of winter, a burger is just not a burger unless it’s cooked slowly over the hot grates of a grill. Hubby may have won the battle, but I was looking long-term and waging to win the war.

After a year or so of no grilling, Hubby began suggesting we grill on occasion. There was no argument, he just went to the grill, lit it up, and grilled. Then, because of the lack of tension between us, I also became far less averse to pitching in and grilling if I happened to plan a meal that included grilling during the week when he was working. I’d light the grill and get the meal almost done in time for his arrival and then he’d finish up while I put everything I’d made in the kitchen on the table.

This compromise on grilling has served us well for the past 20 years. Now however, because Hubby’s work schedule is in such upheaval (working from Monday morning 8 a.m. until Friday afternoon 4 p.m straight with only a short break to come home each day for dinner) I have taken to grilling completely. Dinner is done and on the table when he gets home. He still will grill if we have company, but for the most part, I have taken over the role as Grill Master

As with most things I attempt to do, taking on this new Grill Master role is not taken lightly. Now I am struggling to truly earn that title. At this point I’d have to say I am just barely scraping by, but I continue to work at it. One thing I have learned though is that success in this role has a lot to do with the tools you have to work with. Not just the grill itself or the utensils used, but also the selection of meats as well as the sauces used.

That being said, this year I have been experimenting with various recipes for homemade barbecue sauce. The one I made last year Sizzlin’ Plum Barbecue Sauce didn’t quite turn out how I’d wanted, so this year I tweaked the recipe to make it better (check out my post today on Simply Grateful Canning for the updated version Plum Barbecue Sauce Update). I’m also going to have posts on a few other sauces I’m working on, so keep a lookout.

Marriage can be a battle of wills, but realizing that compromise will serve your relationship better, is what holds you together, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.

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Sizzlin’ Plum Barbecue Sauce

Using every last plum from our plum tree this year was a challenge, but it did give me reason to experiment with several new recipes.  This recipe for plum barbecue sauce turned out really good according to Hubby.  I’ve yet to grill with it, but that will come later in the week once the high temps and humidity pass.

Plum Barbecue Sauce

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  • 6 Cups Plum Pulp (after pitting and putting through a food processor)
  • 1 Large Onion, diced in food processor
  • 1 Large Red Bell Pepper, diced in food processor
  • 14 Cloves Garlic, put through food processor
  • 2 Cups Sliced Roma Tomatoes
  • 1 1/4 Cup Honey
  • 1/3 Cup Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 Cup Molasses
  • 3/4 Cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 Cup Ketchup
  • 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1/2 Tbsp. Hot Pepper Flakes
  • 1 jalapeno, diced in food processor
  • 2 tsp. Dry Mustard
  • 2 tsp. Salt

Put all above ingredients into large stock pot and cook down to consistency of thick barbecue sauce, about 3 hours.

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Use a stick blender to smooth out tomatoes and make sauce a spreadable consistency.

The original recipe was able to be canned in a water bath for 15 minutes but because I changed the recipe so much, I have no idea if this is safe to can or not.  I did process mine in the water bath for 15 minutes, but have it in the refrigerator.  I’m sure it should be fine there for at least 6 months.

Although I have no idea if this is going to be a keeper yet or not, I do love to try new recipes and can new things.  If nothing else, I will chalk this up to experience and have something to base my next experiment in barbecue sauce on, and for this I am — Simply Grateful.